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Dana Schutz in Conversation with Nell Painter

Sat, 1/20/2018, 1:00–2:00 p.m.
Gartner Auditorium

Dana Schutz’s exhibition Eating Atom Bombs at the Transformer Station debuts a new series of paintings that reflect the turbulent political atmosphere in the wake of the 2016 US election. Although American society may seem impossibly divided, the exhibition suggests that ultimately this uncertainty may be what unites us. Schutz joins acclaimed historian and artist Nell Painter in a public conversation about the possibilities and limitations of painting as a medium at our particular historical and political moment. The panelists will also touch on the controversy surrounding Schutz’s painting Open Casket, included in the 2017 Whitney Biennial, which takes as its starting point a well-known photograph of the mutilated corpse of Emmett Till. While Open Casket will not be part of Eating Atom Bombs, the work provides an opportunity to contemplate questions about what art can and should say, as well as the responsibility of art museums in these conversations. Former director of Princeton’s African American Studies program, Painter is the author of the critically acclaimed book The History of White People. A working artist, Painter completed an MFA at the Rhode Island School of Design in 2012. Her paintings engage a global history of race, gender, and self-perception.